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Table 2 Frequency of IgG subclass deficiency according to the presence or absence of associated hypogammaglobulinemia in the merged cohort (MACRO and STATCOPE cohorts combined)

From: Serum IgG subclass levels and risk of exacerbations and hospitalizations in patients with COPD

IgG abnormality Merged Cohort (n = 1629)
IgG1 deficiency – no. (%) 74 (4.5%)
 With hypogammaglobulinemia – no. (%) 72 (4.4%)
 No hypogammaglobulinemia – no. (%) 2 (0.1%)
IgG2 deficiency – no. (%) 93 (5.7%)
 With hypogammaglobulinemia – no. (%) 69 (4.2%)
 No hypogammaglobulinemia – no. (%) 24 (1.5%)
IgG3 deficiency – no. (%) 124 (7.6%)
 With hypogammaglobulinemia – no. (%) 72 (4.4%)
 No hypogammaglobulinemia – no. (%) 52 (3.2%)
IgG4 deficiency – no. (%) 114 (7.0%)
 With hypogammaglobulinemia – no. (%) 73 (4.5%)
 No hypogammaglobulinemia – no. (%) 41 (2.5%)
One or more IgG subclass deficiency – no. (%) 306 (18.8%)
 With hypogammaglobulinemia – no. (%) 197 (12.1%)
 No hypogammaglobulinemia – no. (%) 109 (6.7%)
Two IgG subclass deficiencies combined – no. (%) 47 (2.9%)
 With hypogammaglobulinemia – no. (%) 37 (2.3%)
 No hypogammaglobulinemia – no. (%) 10 (0.6%)
Three IgG subclass deficiencies combined – no. (%)a 20 (1.2%)
All IgG subclass deficiencies combined – no. (%)a 4 (0.2%)
  1. The normal range for IgG levels in adults used in this analysis were: IgG1, 2.8–8.0 g/L; IgG2, 1.15–5.70 g/L; IgG3, 0.24–1.25 g/L; IgG4, 0.052–1.250 g/L; total IgG, 7.0–16.0 g/L. aAll participants were diagnosed with hypogammaglobulinemia (total IgG < 7.0 g/L).