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Table 2 Impact of ever WS exposure on baseline lung function and its declinea

From: Wood smoke exposure affects lung aging, quality of life, and all-cause mortality in New Mexican smokers

Group Years Ever WS exposure Ever WS exposurea years
All subjects    
 FEV1 (ml/s) − 24.2 (1.0) − 75.2 (23.7) − 4.3 (1.9)
 P value  < 0.0001 0.0016 0.025
 FVC (ml) − 15.0 (1.2) − 26.1 (25.2) − 2.4 (2.4)
 P value  < 0.0001 0.30 0.30
 FEV1/FVC ratio (%) − 0.386 (0.019) − 1.792 (0.430) − 0.093 (0.038)
 P value  < 0.0001  < 0.0001 0.015
Age < 55.9 yearb    
 FEV1 (ml/s) − 24.4 (1.5) − 65.6 (30.7) − 0.5 (2.8)
 P value  < 0.0001 0.033 0.85
 FVC (ml) − 13.5 (1.7) − 7.3 (33.1) − 1.6 (3.2)
 P value  < 0.0001 0.82 0.62
 FEV1/FVC ratio (%) − 0.379 (0.029) − 1.666 (0.493) − 0.014 (0.053)
 P value  < 0.0001 0.0008 0.80
Age ≥ 55.9 yearb    
 FEV1 (ml/s) − 24.0 (1.2) − 76.6 (36.8) − 8.7 (2.6)
 P value  < 0.0001 0.038 0.001
 FVC (ml) − 16.0 (1.6) − 37.5 (38.7) − 3.8 (3.5)
 P value  < 0.0001 0.33 0.28
 FEV1/FVC ratio (%) − 0.391(0.026) − 2.013 (0.724) − 0.196 (0.055)
 P value  < 0.0001 0.0055 0.0004
  1. WS woodsmoke
  2. aLinear mixed effects model was used to assess the impact of ever WS exposure on lung function decline through including an interaction term between ever WS exposure and time in cohort. We included fixed effects for baseline age, BMI, height, smoking status, and packyears, sex, and ethnicities, and random effects for intercept and time in cohort.
  3. bCohort was stratified based on a median age of 55.9 year