Skip to main content

Table 5 Associations between second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure at the first examination and lung function and decline

From: Second-hand smoke exposure in adulthood and lower respiratory health during 20 year follow up in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey

  Total Male Female
β 95%-CI p-value β 95%-CI p-value β 95%-CI p-value
FEV1a
 SHS exposureb −44 (−82, −5) 0.03 −75 (− 140, − 11) 0.02 −13 (− 57, 31) 0.56
 SHS exposure*follow-up timec 1 (0, 3) 0.03 2 (0, 4) 0.03 1 (−1, 3) 0.19
FVCa
 SHS exposureb − 56 (−102, − 10) 0.02 − 102 (− 179, − 24) 0.01 −19 (−71, 33) 0.47
 SHS exposure*follow-up timec 2 (0, 4) 0.02 3 (0, 6) 0.03 2 (0, 4) 0.09
FEV1/FVCa
 SHS exposureb 0.0 (− 0.5, 0.5) 0.96 0.1 (− 0.6, 0.9) 0.71 0.1 (−0.6, 0.7) 0.88
 SHS exposure*follow-up timec 0.0 (0.0, 0.0) 0.94 0.0 (0.0, 0.0) 0.96 0.0 (0.0, 0.0) 0.62
  1. Models are adjusted for age, age squared, weight, weight squared, height, combination of smoking status and pack years, maternal smoking, paternal smoking, allergic sensitisation, education and exposure to dust/fumes as well as for sex in the total study population
  2. aan interaction term between time between follow-ups and SHS exposure is included to determine the effect of SHS exposure on lung function decline
  3. ba negative estimate suggests that those exposed to SHS at the first examination had lower average lung function at all three examinations than those not exposed
  4. ca negative estimate suggests that those exposed to SHS at the first examination had a higher decline in lung function between the examinations than those not exposed
  5. * indicating the interaction term between SHS exposure and time of follow-up