Skip to main content

Table 2 Characteristics of the prescribed medication of the 165 study participants at baseline

From: Use and inhalation technique of inhaled medication in patients with asthma and COPD: data from a randomized controlled trial

Variable Number (%)
All
(n = 165)
Asthma
(n = 50)
COPD
(n = 89)
ACO
(n = 26)
Medication (n = 326)
 LABA/ LAMA combinations 21 (6.4) 1 (0.3) 16 (4.9) 4 (1.2)
 LABA/ICS combinations 116 (35.5) 44 (13.5) 50 (15.3) 22 (6.7)
 LAMA 75 (23) 5 (1.5) 60 (18.4) 10 (3.1)
 LABA 23 (7) 3 (0.9)a 15 (4.6) 5 (1.5)
 ICS 17 (5.2) 8 (2.5) 4 (1.2) 5 (1.5)
 SAMA 2 (0.6) 1 (0.3) 1 (0.3) 0 (0)
 SABA 68 (20.9) 28 (8.6) 31 (9.5) 9 (2.8)
 SABA/SAMA combinations 4 (1.2) 0 (0) 1 (0.3) 3 (0.9)
Number of inhaled medication at baseline
 1 50 (30.3) 17 (34) 27 (30.3) 6 (23.1)
 2 71 (43) 26 (52) 37 (41.6) 8 (30.8)
 3 42 (25.5) 7 (14) 23 (25.8) 12 (46.2)
 4 2 (1.2) 0 (0) 2 (2.2) 0 (0)
  1. ACO Asthma-COPD-overlap, LABA Long acting beta2-agonist, LAMA Long acting muscarinic antagonist, ICS Inhaled corticosteroid, SAMA Short acting muscarinic antagonist; SABA, Short acting beta2-agonist
  2. aThe 3 asthma patients with a LABA-medication also had an ICS medication as part of their treatment plan (in separate devices and not as a combined preparation). Thus, monotherapy with LABA in asthmatic patients did not occur due to the fact that it can increase the exacerbation risk by masking the asthma symptoms (FDA Drug Safety Communication [38])