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Table 3 Practitioners’ responses to questions regarding sources of e-cigarette guidance and reported advice provided

From: Electronic cigarettes: a survey of perceived patient use and attitudes among members of the British thoracic oncology group

Variable Participants n (%)
Awareness of IASLC statement regarding e-cigarette use among cancer patientsa  
  Yes 37 (27.6)
  No 97 (72.4)
Workplace recommended advice that practitioners should provide regarding e-cigarettesa
  Yes 12 (9.0)
  No 122 (91.0)
“I feel I need more information and guidance regarding electronic cigarettes”a  
  Strongly agree 53 (39.6)
  Agree 71 (53.0)
  Neutral 4 (3.0)
  Disagree 6 (4.5)
  Strongly disagree 0 (0.0)
“I feel confident advising patients regarding electronic cigarettes” a  
  Strongly agree 4 (3.0)
  Agree 24 (18.0)
  Neutral 39 (29.3)
  Disagree 49 (36.8)
  Strongly disagree 17 (12.8)
Advice given to patients regarding e-cigarettesb  
  E-cigarettes are less harmful than regular cigarettes 45 (23.7)
  Paucity of research and uncertainty regarding adverse effects 41 (21.6)
  Patients should avoid using regular or electronic cigarettes altogether 25 (13.2)
  E-cigarettes may be an effective tool for smoking cessation 20 (10.5)
  E-cigarette use is discouraged 11 (5.8)
  Seek support via Stop Smoking Services 10 (5.3)
  Lack of regulation and caution regarding quality control 10 (5.3)
  No advice provided 9 (4.7)
  E-cigarette use is encouraged 7 (3.7)
  Consider the use of licenced smoking cessation treatments primarily 5 (2.6)
  E-cigarettes may be harmful to health 3 (1.6)
  Inadequate knowledge to advise 3 (1.6)
  No clear guidelines from professional bodies 1 (0.5)
  1. aFigures do not equate to 141 due to some missing data, bMore than one answer could be provided